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WE ADD UP, a culture-changing marketer (a “tremendous” one at that, says none other than Al Gore) features an essay by Nature Calendar writer Erik Baard on its blog.

Here’s a tease and a link to more:

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Give me sustainability and conservation, but not yet.

That’s a poor plea for the 21st century, but the American ecological sentiment seems to parallel the St. Augustine’s prayer for chastity and continence as a debauched youth. We seem to want to stay on the just-forgivable side of “sinning” against nature.

Is building a “sustainable economy” a matter of tweaking the machinery of our current lifestyles to stay narrowly within the Earth’s survival margins? Is conservation meant to secure images of natural plenty merely for our own peace of mind?

To save our environment, President-elect Barack Obama will have to do much more than raise automobile fuel standards, reverse President Bush’s ill-conceived executive orders, and invest in alternative energy. He must lead a profound culture change that redefines the material American Dream, or nurture the culture change that starts with us at the grass roots. Despite the campaign slogan “we are the change we need,” it’s truer to say that we need to change. Few voters want to hear that, and no politician will win on that theme.

Full article here:

http://www.weaddup.com/blog/archives/give-me-sustainability-and-conservation-but-not-yet/

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While you’re there, please take a look at WE ADD UP’s hand-printed, organic cotton shirts, each of which is emblazoned with a small action any one of us can take to improve the environment. WE ADD UP was created by artist Jill Palermo, whose “Plant Trees” t-shirt icon is pictured above.

To learn more about WE ADD UP, click here.

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When Transportation Alternative’s absolutely wonderful Tour de Queens (enjoy the Street Films video above) rolled into Maspeth on Sunday under the blaze of a record-setting June heat wave, we were subjected to a brutal lesson in urban planning and natural history.

 

The Newtown Creek is infamous for being home to the largest oil spill in U.S. history, and to heavy metals and other industrial pollutants. Increasingly, lay greens are becoming aware of the combined sewer overflows that plague the waterway with pathogens after rainstorms. What’s less known is that, apart from airport landing strips, you won’t find hotter a hotter place in New York City than the banks of the Newtown Creek. The area’s sewage and swelter share the same origin: a concrete and asphalt “hardscape” instead of a landscape. In the absence of trees, grass, and other plants, water rolls off the impermeable surfaces and floods the sewage system while sunlight beats down on unshaded streets that reradiate heat.

 

NASA used Landsat to map our “urban heat island,” where temperatures are over seven degrees Fahrenheit hotter than surrounding region. Maspeth was of particular interest to the NASA researchers because it was both particularly afflicted and a prime candidate for mitigation, with low, flat-topped, strong buildings that could bear the weight of green roofs.

 

 NASA thermal image of New York City.

 

The natural history element I alluded to above is of greater concern to bikers than NASA: Oh, the hills! Maspeth sits on the western end of the Harbor Hill Moraine (as you can see in the U.S. Geological Survey map below) that was plowed up by glaciers over 10,000 years ago.

 

 

USGS Harbor Hill Moraine.

 

The image below is Helen Ho’s photograph of the Queens Museum’s celebrated New York City panaroma model, with pink tape showing our route over the hills and through the mini-torrid zone. 

 

 

Tour de Queens route in the panorama. Photo by Helen Ho.

 

I wrote for the Village Voice about the Urban Heat Island phenomenon (including diet, lifestyle, and city planning tips to survive it) and various animal heat adaptations last year. One part that didn’t get published is the fascinating possibility that migrating birds are leaving New York City plumper than they arrived because they needn’t burn as many calories to stay warm at night. I spent a morning in the woods of Bronx Park observing Chad Seewagen, a Wildlife Conservation Society ornithologist, investigating this hunch. My friends Robin Lloyd and David Berreby later wrote up items about Chad and his work for Live Science and the New Yorker, respectively.

 

 

 

These days, however, most species are working hard to shed heat. Humans are particularly lucky in that we sweat copiously, a gift from our tropical heritage that remains with people of all ancestries. Bear in mind, however, that parents can undo in their own kids’ resilience by raising them with air conditioning; sweat glands that aren’t activated in infancy remain dormant for life. Dogs are among the species that have wet noses, long tongues, and very wrinkled nasal passages to allow for heat exchanges with the air.

 

My favorite evolutionary solution is the carotid rete, a fine web where arteries dump heat into veins and the upper respiratory system so that blood rising to the brain is significantly cooler than the rest of the body. Gazelles have an extraordinarily well-developed carotid rete, but humans are much less impressive in that regard. It’s usually brain temperature that dictates when an animal must stop or pass out, so you can imagine how useful such a tool is for hunters and especially fleeing prey.

 

And so I might have been the only volunteer marshal ready to scream, “A carotid rete! My kingdom for a carotid rete!”

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