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Full moon perigee of 2008 by Ron Hodges.

Full moon perigee of 2008 by Ron Hodges.

by Erik Baard

 

What a Wolf Moon this will be! Tonight will be the biggest full moon of 2009, and the glory it borrows from the sun will be reflected from every snowy rooftop, branch, and field…if the clouds break.

The moon increases in apparent size for two reasons. Routinely we observe an apparent swelling in the moonrise. Because of a quirk of human optical neurology we percieve the moon as larger on the horizon, rather than overhead. But the moon is also at times closer or further from Earth in different points of its elliptical orbit. Tonight is perigee, the closest pass. It will appear 14 percent larger and 30 brighter than what you’ll typically find for the rest of the year.

Near-full perigee moon. Captured Dec. 9 in Kingston, NY by Jeffrey Anzevino of Scenic Hudson.

Near-full perigee moon. Captured Jan. 9 in Kingston, NY by Jeffrey Anzevino of Scenic Hudson.

Of course, oldsters might tell a young’n that the moon was bigger and brighter when they were young. Well, they’re right in fact but there’s no way a human could detect it: the satellite is ever-so-slowly spiralling away from its host planet. Each year it stretches our gravitational bonds by about 1.6 inches (4cm).

The moon tantalizes us, draws us into the Cosmos beyond. At some level, this is our narrowness making us silly: we are born, live, and die in space as much as those who might do the same on any other world. Still, it remains a place of national posturing, from the Space Race of the 1960s to the emerging powers of India and China.

For an inner city child, however, the lure of the moon is that it reveals a real topography to his or her eyes from any street corner, even without expensive equipment or the crystal clear skies of the backwoods. As South Bronxite Neil deGrasse Tyson told me for a Village Voice article, a realm of personal possibilities was opened when he stared at the moon from his stoop through a pair of binoculars after his father took him to Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History.

“I saw the mountains and valleys and craters of the moon. It became another world, something to learn about,” he remembers. “I knew I wanted to be a scientist since I was nine years old and I never wavered.”

He is now an astrophysicist and the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium.

* As a side note, the mountains are seen better on a half or crescent moon, because features are seen in relief. Straight on, light bounces back up from every little crevice, washing out our view.

My own enjoyment of tonight’s delight takes me back to the wintry Snow Moon perigee of February 1988. I was staying over at Smith College with my then-girlfriend (who now works for an oil company — some things weren’t meant to be). Seeing her sleep inspired this poem (and forgive that WordPress always screws up spacing and formatting):

 

 
It is no matter of wonder
to me
 
that light should wander
from the nurturing warmth of the sun
 
across cold vast space

to the broad and barren moon

to the field of snow outside
to find

the peace of being lost

in my sleeping lover’s

black hair.

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East River book cover.

East River book cover.

A good chunk of the East River book is now online for free! Get some hot cocoa and enjoy?

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Early childhood learning program.

Hour Children: Early childhood learning program.

 
(NOTE: WORDPRESS IS HAVING TROUBLE WITH POSTED DOCUMENTS. PLEASE EMAIL naturecalendar@gmail.com for an application and information!)
 
 

Save the child, save the planet.
 
Play matchmaker between nature and a kid from Hour Children, a group that cares for kids whose mothers are in prison or are recently released and working to start a new lives. Hour Children is looking for responsible adults to commit four hours each month to share new and healthy experiences with these young one, typically between the ages of five and eleven. Take a kid out to plant trees, hike in a park or botanical garden, bike a greenway, paddle or row at a community boathouse, garden, stargaze with amateur astronomers, bird watch, or swim at the beach. Do what you love, and share it with a kid sometimes.

Through the links below, please find an application form for the Friends in Deed program (which now has a Facebook group) and other materials:
 

APPLICATION:

hourchildren-online_mentoring_app4

 
Piles of research show that kids grow up healthier when they are physically active and have a relationship with nature. Their school performance improves and they are better adjusted. They are happier. The Earth will benefit too, with a new generation rising with environmental values born of these formative encounters.
 
“These kids are open to all kinds of things,” said Mentoring Coordinator Michelene Jones. “They just want something they can grab onto.” (So please pass this along to your other friends, who might also introduce the kids to great stuff in art, science, literature, business, sports, music, technology, civics, or other realms of knowledge.) A male mentor will be paired with a boy, while a female mentor could be paired with either a boy or girl. Men are in short supply, Jones added. A special “guys day” at Aviator Sports and Recreation has been scheduled. Call Hour Children at 718-433-4724 ext. 21 for more information.

The four hours per month can be all in one shot, or an hour weekly. It’s up to the mentor, in consultation with staff.
 
I sent my application in, and the next training session is January 9. My other experiences with Hour Children have been great. I’ve done just a bit of grunt labor (scrubbing donated highchairs, scraping basement walls, baking holiday cookies, assembling cribs, etc.), but it’s always been a joy. I’m confident you’ll have fun too!
 
As part of my commitment to the mentoring program, I will be returning the weekly Wildwire to Nature Calendar so that mentors (and parents, teachers…) have a quick and easy guide to eco-recreation in the city. If enough Nature Calendar readers want to participate, we can coordinate a monthly outing with the kids. My 2009 New Year’s resolution!

And so, a very happy new year to you, and hopefully a lucky kid who’ll get to know you!

— Erik

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newtown_pippin_toa

Imagine the sandy shores of Dumbo, Stuyvesant Cove, Hunters Point, South Beach, and Pelham Bay resplendent with bushes full of white blossoms that grow into delicious fruits akin to fat cherries as summer passes. Or seeing trees at City Hall, or in a school playground just inland from the Newtown Creek, heavy with sublimely sweet and tart green apples.

Welcome to New York City, 2015!

Well, potentially. Check this page in the coming weeks to learn how you can be part of bringing beach plums and Newtown Pippin apples back to NYC! It might even be possible to have the Newtown Pippin recognized as the official apple of the Big Apple. We have some amazing sponsors and partners already committed to plantings and helping others receive saplings.

Beach plums grow in sandy soil, even dunes, from New Jersey to eastern Canada. They sustain birds and delight beachcombers, and provide a living for those who make them into desserts. Industrialization erased them from our city’s shores.

Newtown Pippins were developed on the Queens bank of the Newtown Creek in the 18th century and quickly became known as the “prince of apples.” Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and Queen Victoria were all ardent fans. Today they are grown by celebrities like Dave Matthews. They consistently win apple taste competitions to this day. The namesake creek has quietly descended into a state that should shame all New Yorkers. The nation’s largest oil spill leaches into it while combined sewer outflows continually assault it. The creek bed is laden with heavy metal wastes.

beachlg

May the restoration of these species remind us of how lush and wondrous our environment once was, and inspire us to act to replenish our city.

One key element of the campaign will be to excite city officials by providing a taste of these plums and apples. On Saturday, Dec. 13, we will carpool or take a train out to Riverhead, Long Island, to buy apples, cider, plum jams, plum pies, and other delicacies at Briermere Farm. While we are there, there will be some exploring, of course!

If you’d like to come, please email naturecalendar@gmail.com so that we can determine how best to coordinate travel.

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WeAddUp.com's "Plant Trees" icon.

WeAddUp.com

WE ADD UP, a culture-changing marketer (a “tremendous” one at that, says none other than Al Gore) features an essay by Nature Calendar writer Erik Baard on its blog.

Here’s a tease and a link to more:

_________________________________________________________

Give me sustainability and conservation, but not yet.

That’s a poor plea for the 21st century, but the American ecological sentiment seems to parallel the St. Augustine’s prayer for chastity and continence as a debauched youth. We seem to want to stay on the just-forgivable side of “sinning” against nature.

Is building a “sustainable economy” a matter of tweaking the machinery of our current lifestyles to stay narrowly within the Earth’s survival margins? Is conservation meant to secure images of natural plenty merely for our own peace of mind?

To save our environment, President-elect Barack Obama will have to do much more than raise automobile fuel standards, reverse President Bush’s ill-conceived executive orders, and invest in alternative energy. He must lead a profound culture change that redefines the material American Dream, or nurture the culture change that starts with us at the grass roots. Despite the campaign slogan “we are the change we need,” it’s truer to say that we need to change. Few voters want to hear that, and no politician will win on that theme.

Full article here:

http://www.weaddup.com/blog/archives/give-me-sustainability-and-conservation-but-not-yet/

_______________________________________________________

While you’re there, please take a look at WE ADD UP’s hand-printed, organic cotton shirts, each of which is emblazoned with a small action any one of us can take to improve the environment. WE ADD UP was created by artist Jill Palermo, whose “Plant Trees” t-shirt icon is pictured above.

To learn more about WE ADD UP, click here.

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The Discovery Channel is casting its new adventure show, set in Alaska. I’ve uploaded the application here:

casting-alaska-challenge-call_final22

Directly from Ronica Wynder of Camouflage TV:

<<Greetings Nature Calendar,

The Discovery Channel has a wonderful opportunity for all of you nature lovers. We’re now casting for a new reality tv show, the Alaska Challenge show. I have attached a document that will explain the show. If this interests you, anyone else in the group, or anyone you may know. Please follow the directions listed in the document.

Thank you for your time,

Ronica Wynder>>

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Hi All!

NYC’s greenest restaurant, Habana Outpost, is hosting a “Winter Warm Up” talk and happy hour. Learn about Prospect Park and the Audubon Center while mixing with fun and friendly teachers. Oh yeah, and enjoy Habana Outpost’s delicious food, party atmosphere, and ecological model before it shuts on Oct 31!

More info through this link:

http://habanaworks.org/

And read the details below!

I hope to see you there!

Erik

<><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><>

Event Info
Host:
Type:
Network:
Global
Time and Place
Date:
Wednesday, October 22, 2008
Time:
5:00pm – 7:00pm
Location:
Habana Outpost
Street:
757 Fulton Street
City/Town:
Brooklyn, NY
Contact Info
Phone:
7189095580
Email:

Description

Next Winter Warm Up: Prospect Park Alliance!

The happy hour for teachers continues…with a presentation from our neighbors in Prospect Park about their Audubon Center!

Here are the details from our series calendar:
“Located in the historic Boathouse, the Prospect Park Audubon Center is a unique place where talented Park staff challenge students to actively explore the natural world around them. Audubon Center staff teach by asking questions, engaging students, and exploring Prospect Park’s 585 acres of meadows, ponds, waterfalls, and woodlands. All Programs at the Audubon Center support New York State Learning Standards and New York City Performance Standards to promote student achievement in science, math, and language arts. Our programs offer exciting learning opportunities for each season, to complement any environment- or science-based curricula. Programmatic themes for Nature and Science include: Birding, Meadow, Winter, Water, Soil, and Forest.”

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Alchemy at Gowanus Studio Space.

Alchemy at Gowanus Studio Space.

TONIGHT: Free admission to a party of environmentalists and art lovers!

Beer by Kelso of Brooklyn!

DJ Dave “Roosting Box” Nardone!

What’s all the fuss about?

Well, sometimes hardened urbanites think that it would take green alchemy to create habitat on our mean streets. The good folks at the Gowanus Studio Space in Brooklyn (119 8th Street, between 2nd and 3rd Avenues. Subway: F or G to Smith/9th St. or F, M or R to 4th Ave./9th St.) have conjured just that, featuring reclamation artist Atom Cianfarani’s guerilla habitat restoration, “Suspended Nurseries” and “For the Birds.”

The Alchemy show focuses on how discarded commodities can be reused to investigate our relationship with nature, and perhaps even benefit it. “Suspended Nurseries” and “For the Birds” make use of our waste and ignored resources like rainwater to quietly overlay our city’s hardscape with sustaining ecological niches. Native species rejoice!

And you too!

Poke around these websites for directions and more information:

http://www.gowanusstudio.org/

http://www.atomsdream.com

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by Erik Baard

 

As I walked past the Sunnyside Railyards yesterday I spotted a tree with a crown that each year is generously laden with green-gold pods. It’s rising up from beside the tracks, reaching eye level for strollers on the south side of the overpass. It occurred to me that while I’ve seen this kind of tree countless times throughout my life, I didn’t know its name.

 

When I focus on a tree these days, the first question I ask is its name, followed by “can I eat it?” For the latter obsession, I blame Wildman Steve Brill. The foraging instinct that he reawakened in me is useful not so much as a survival tool as a prime mover toward general ecological knowledge. Once I’ve asked that, the other questions come flooding: If I eat it, with what species am I now competing for food? If I can’t eat it, what chemicals are there to thwart me, and why? What species are able to eat it and what’s different about their physiology? Did those species co-evolve with the tree because they are superior vectors for spreading seeds?

 

Anyway, I did some digging and found some foresters who want us all to do some more digging…to uproot the species.

 

Oh, “Tree of Heaven!” Oh, “Ghetto Palm!” It’s amazing how a species can be viewed with such difference. We’ve already considered how the pigeon is “revered and reviled,” to use Andrew Blechman’s phrase, as a carrier of both the Holy Spirit and disease. Anthropologist Mary Douglas defined dirt, as opposed to soil, as “matter out of place.” The Ailanthus tree is indeed “out of place”; it’s an invasive species from eastern and southern Asia and northern Australasia. I also guess it doesn’t help that the male flowers of this tree smell like cat urine.

 

I couldn’t find a reason for its more flattering moniker, translated from the Ambonese in Indonesia. Folk medicine practitioners do make some intriguing claims for the tree though; Asian tradition holds that the bark is good for lowering heart rate, reducing muscle spasms, and, well, delaying a particular spasm that could cause your Fourth of July fireworks to shoot off a little too soon. Maybe it was an Ambonese wife who named the tree?

 

The inimitably New York name stems from the hardiness of this tree. Even when the city fails to green a community or lot, Ailanthus trees will find a way to grow. Park Slope has its London planes, while back alleys have the ubiquitous “poverty tree.”

 

That ability to thrive in urban wastelands spotlights another similarity between pigeons and ailanthus trees: despite being so opportunistic, they are usually benign to other, indigenous species because they specialize in unclaimed niches. There are places, however, where Ailanthus can be a destructive force. At forest fringes and clearings, or where new forests are being seeded, Ailanthus squeezes out slower-growing but essential native trees. One good case of this is Conference House Park on Staten Island. Volunteers are needed to yank young Ailanthus on Monday, from 1PM through 4PM. But be careful not to pluck similar-looking sumac, ash, black walnut, or pecan.

 

If you can help, RSVP by calling 718-390-8021 or emailing cheri.brunault@parks.nyc.gov as soon as possible.

 

And even as you’re thrashing the Ailanthus out of our city’s bucolic frontier in southern Staten Island, keep some gratitude in your heart for the shade it provides us when it seeds into the toughest hardscapes of the urban core.

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