Posts Tagged ‘urban ecology’


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Full moon perigee of 2008 by Ron Hodges.

Full moon perigee of 2008 by Ron Hodges.

by Erik Baard


What a Wolf Moon this will be! Tonight will be the biggest full moon of 2009, and the glory it borrows from the sun will be reflected from every snowy rooftop, branch, and field…if the clouds break.

The moon increases in apparent size for two reasons. Routinely we observe an apparent swelling in the moonrise. Because of a quirk of human optical neurology we percieve the moon as larger on the horizon, rather than overhead. But the moon is also at times closer or further from Earth in different points of its elliptical orbit. Tonight is perigee, the closest pass. It will appear 14 percent larger and 30 brighter than what you’ll typically find for the rest of the year.

Near-full perigee moon. Captured Dec. 9 in Kingston, NY by Jeffrey Anzevino of Scenic Hudson.

Near-full perigee moon. Captured Jan. 9 in Kingston, NY by Jeffrey Anzevino of Scenic Hudson.

Of course, oldsters might tell a young’n that the moon was bigger and brighter when they were young. Well, they’re right in fact but there’s no way a human could detect it: the satellite is ever-so-slowly spiralling away from its host planet. Each year it stretches our gravitational bonds by about 1.6 inches (4cm).

The moon tantalizes us, draws us into the Cosmos beyond. At some level, this is our narrowness making us silly: we are born, live, and die in space as much as those who might do the same on any other world. Still, it remains a place of national posturing, from the Space Race of the 1960s to the emerging powers of India and China.

For an inner city child, however, the lure of the moon is that it reveals a real topography to his or her eyes from any street corner, even without expensive equipment or the crystal clear skies of the backwoods. As South Bronxite Neil deGrasse Tyson told me for a Village Voice article, a realm of personal possibilities was opened when he stared at the moon from his stoop through a pair of binoculars after his father took him to Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History.

“I saw the mountains and valleys and craters of the moon. It became another world, something to learn about,” he remembers. “I knew I wanted to be a scientist since I was nine years old and I never wavered.”

He is now an astrophysicist and the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium.

* As a side note, the mountains are seen better on a half or crescent moon, because features are seen in relief. Straight on, light bounces back up from every little crevice, washing out our view.

My own enjoyment of tonight’s delight takes me back to the wintry Snow Moon perigee of February 1988. I was staying over at Smith College with my then-girlfriend (who now works for an oil company — some things weren’t meant to be). Seeing her sleep inspired this poem (and forgive that WordPress always screws up spacing and formatting):


It is no matter of wonder
to me
that light should wander
from the nurturing warmth of the sun
across cold vast space

to the broad and barren moon

to the field of snow outside
to find

the peace of being lost

in my sleeping lover’s

black hair.

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East River book cover.

East River book cover.

A good chunk of the East River book is now online for free! Get some hot cocoa and enjoy?


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Early childhood learning program.

Hour Children: Early childhood learning program.

(NOTE: WORDPRESS IS HAVING TROUBLE WITH POSTED DOCUMENTS. PLEASE EMAIL naturecalendar@gmail.com for an application and information!)

Save the child, save the planet.
Play matchmaker between nature and a kid from Hour Children, a group that cares for kids whose mothers are in prison or are recently released and working to start a new lives. Hour Children is looking for responsible adults to commit four hours each month to share new and healthy experiences with these young one, typically between the ages of five and eleven. Take a kid out to plant trees, hike in a park or botanical garden, bike a greenway, paddle or row at a community boathouse, garden, stargaze with amateur astronomers, bird watch, or swim at the beach. Do what you love, and share it with a kid sometimes.

Through the links below, please find an application form for the Friends in Deed program (which now has a Facebook group) and other materials:



Piles of research show that kids grow up healthier when they are physically active and have a relationship with nature. Their school performance improves and they are better adjusted. They are happier. The Earth will benefit too, with a new generation rising with environmental values born of these formative encounters.
“These kids are open to all kinds of things,” said Mentoring Coordinator Michelene Jones. “They just want something they can grab onto.” (So please pass this along to your other friends, who might also introduce the kids to great stuff in art, science, literature, business, sports, music, technology, civics, or other realms of knowledge.) A male mentor will be paired with a boy, while a female mentor could be paired with either a boy or girl. Men are in short supply, Jones added. A special “guys day” at Aviator Sports and Recreation has been scheduled. Call Hour Children at 718-433-4724 ext. 21 for more information.

The four hours per month can be all in one shot, or an hour weekly. It’s up to the mentor, in consultation with staff.
I sent my application in, and the next training session is January 9. My other experiences with Hour Children have been great. I’ve done just a bit of grunt labor (scrubbing donated highchairs, scraping basement walls, baking holiday cookies, assembling cribs, etc.), but it’s always been a joy. I’m confident you’ll have fun too!
As part of my commitment to the mentoring program, I will be returning the weekly Wildwire to Nature Calendar so that mentors (and parents, teachers…) have a quick and easy guide to eco-recreation in the city. If enough Nature Calendar readers want to participate, we can coordinate a monthly outing with the kids. My 2009 New Year’s resolution!

And so, a very happy new year to you, and hopefully a lucky kid who’ll get to know you!

— Erik


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Imagine the sandy shores of Dumbo, Stuyvesant Cove, Hunters Point, South Beach, and Pelham Bay resplendent with bushes full of white blossoms that grow into delicious fruits akin to fat cherries as summer passes. Or seeing trees at City Hall, or in a school playground just inland from the Newtown Creek, heavy with sublimely sweet and tart green apples.

Welcome to New York City, 2015!

Well, potentially. Check this page in the coming weeks to learn how you can be part of bringing beach plums and Newtown Pippin apples back to NYC! It might even be possible to have the Newtown Pippin recognized as the official apple of the Big Apple. We have some amazing sponsors and partners already committed to plantings and helping others receive saplings.

Beach plums grow in sandy soil, even dunes, from New Jersey to eastern Canada. They sustain birds and delight beachcombers, and provide a living for those who make them into desserts. Industrialization erased them from our city’s shores.

Newtown Pippins were developed on the Queens bank of the Newtown Creek in the 18th century and quickly became known as the “prince of apples.” Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and Queen Victoria were all ardent fans. Today they are grown by celebrities like Dave Matthews. They consistently win apple taste competitions to this day. The namesake creek has quietly descended into a state that should shame all New Yorkers. The nation’s largest oil spill leaches into it while combined sewer outflows continually assault it. The creek bed is laden with heavy metal wastes.


May the restoration of these species remind us of how lush and wondrous our environment once was, and inspire us to act to replenish our city.

One key element of the campaign will be to excite city officials by providing a taste of these plums and apples. On Saturday, Dec. 13, we will carpool or take a train out to Riverhead, Long Island, to buy apples, cider, plum jams, plum pies, and other delicacies at Briermere Farm. While we are there, there will be some exploring, of course!

If you’d like to come, please email naturecalendar@gmail.com so that we can determine how best to coordinate travel.


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WeAddUp.com's "Plant Trees" icon.


WE ADD UP, a culture-changing marketer (a “tremendous” one at that, says none other than Al Gore) features an essay by Nature Calendar writer Erik Baard on its blog.

Here’s a tease and a link to more:


Give me sustainability and conservation, but not yet.

That’s a poor plea for the 21st century, but the American ecological sentiment seems to parallel the St. Augustine’s prayer for chastity and continence as a debauched youth. We seem to want to stay on the just-forgivable side of “sinning” against nature.

Is building a “sustainable economy” a matter of tweaking the machinery of our current lifestyles to stay narrowly within the Earth’s survival margins? Is conservation meant to secure images of natural plenty merely for our own peace of mind?

To save our environment, President-elect Barack Obama will have to do much more than raise automobile fuel standards, reverse President Bush’s ill-conceived executive orders, and invest in alternative energy. He must lead a profound culture change that redefines the material American Dream, or nurture the culture change that starts with us at the grass roots. Despite the campaign slogan “we are the change we need,” it’s truer to say that we need to change. Few voters want to hear that, and no politician will win on that theme.

Full article here:



While you’re there, please take a look at WE ADD UP’s hand-printed, organic cotton shirts, each of which is emblazoned with a small action any one of us can take to improve the environment. WE ADD UP was created by artist Jill Palermo, whose “Plant Trees” t-shirt icon is pictured above.

To learn more about WE ADD UP, click here.


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The Discovery Channel is casting its new adventure show, set in Alaska. I’ve uploaded the application here:


Directly from Ronica Wynder of Camouflage TV:

<<Greetings Nature Calendar,

The Discovery Channel has a wonderful opportunity for all of you nature lovers. We’re now casting for a new reality tv show, the Alaska Challenge show. I have attached a document that will explain the show. If this interests you, anyone else in the group, or anyone you may know. Please follow the directions listed in the document.

Thank you for your time,

Ronica Wynder>>


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